Monthly Archives: July 2008

Expelled from Preschool

‘Just read an MSN story about kids getting expelled from preschools. I admit I hadn’t thought about this problem. My youngest child has ADHD with Impulsivity so we’ve had similar struggles. Last year, when he was in 4th grade, he lost his school bus riding privileges for several months because he couldn’t control his behavior. The impact was harder on me and my schedule than him.

My advice? Reduce the stress in your kids’ lives. Downscale their after-school and weekend schedules. Kids need downtime. “I’m bored” is not all bad – it means that they’re not overscheduled. Make sure they get enough sleep, even if it seems too early to send them to bed. Breathe – and hug your kids!

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Oh Great – Another “Hot Worry” for Working Parents

I was just reading about the huge success of Dominique Raccah, who started Sourcebooks 20 years ago. It is now the nation’s largest woman-owned publishing house, selling 4.5 million books/year. She thinks the next hot topic is… childhood obesity.

Oh great. With all the demands and pressures from working and raising great kids, I feel like this is another straw on our collective camel’s back of things that working parents are supposed to worry about.

Give each of your kids a raw carrot to eat – and then give them a hug.

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Working Parents: Freedom from Kids or Work?

I just learned a new  word: “Kidsickness.”  It’s when parents miss their kids. I mention it now because many parents and their kids can’t wait until the kids go off to summer camp or to visit a grandparent for a week or two. Yet soon after the kids depart, the kids become homesick and the parents get “kidsick” until they are reunited.

The lesson: Although an occasional separation is good, at their core, families long to be together – and hug.

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